2nd World Congress on

Dental Research

November 14-16, 2016, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Scientific Programme(Day 1 : Nov-14-2016)

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Keynote Speaker

Ramesh S. Chaughule
Ex Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, India
Title: Surface Modified Nano TiO2 in Resin Materials– a Step in Improved Restorative Dentistry

Biography: Dr. Ramesh Chaughule has completed his PhD from Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, a pioneer research institute in Mumbai, India. Also he graduated in Electronics and Telecommunication Engineering. Presently he is an Adjunct Professor at Ramnarain Ruia College, Mumbai, India. Dr. Chaughule has pioneered in the field of NMR and MRI. He was deputed to Indonesia by IAEA several times as an IAEA expert in the field of NMR. He is an awardee of many international Fellowships to carry out research programs in different countries. Besides number of research publications and book chapters to his credit, Dr. Chaughule has edited several books on MRI and Nanotechnology published by American Scientific Publishers, USA. He has organized several international conferences in India.

Abstract: The ultimate goal of dentistry and dental technology is to maintain or improve the quality of life of the dental patient. The early generation of composites proved to be failure for posterior restorations due to their poor wear resistance, rough surface and high rate of polymerization shrinkage. This was due to large particles size of fillers. A study of the modification of dental nanocomposites with nanosized fillers is presented. The properties are improved drastically by reducing the size of fillers based on nanotechnology. The composite resins consist of three basic phases - the organic phase (matrix), the dispersed phase (filler) and the interfacial phase (coupling agent). The resin matrix is a mixture of methacrylate/acrylate monomers. During the application, the monomers of resin matrix are polymerized to crosslinked polymer structure by free radical nonlinear polymerization process. In order to achieve a strong covalent interaction in between the organic matrix and inorganic fillers, coupling agents are used. The coupling agents tend to promote bonding or adhesion between the filler particles and matrix and helping in the transfer of load and stresses. A commonly used silane coupling agent is aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APTES). One side of the coupling agent tends to bond with hydroxyl groups of silica particles and other is copolymerized with polymer matrix. Non-toxic TiO2 has good antibacterial properties and is selected as an additive to the dental nanocomposite material. The incorporation of TiO2 (titania) nanoparticles, via a silane chemical bond, to a standard dental acrylic resin matrix showed an increase in the wear resistance, flexural strength and surface hardness properties of the dental nanocomposites. Flexural strength and modulus of the nanocomposite resin with modified nano TiO2 is studied and shows there is an increase in these properties with increase in nano TiO2-resin wt% to some extent. For comparison, a commercially available dental resin was reinforced with untreated and treated nano-TiO2 particles with various sizes. The enhancement of mechanical properties is mainly attributed to the resin-mediated covalent linkage and the strong physical interaction between matrix and nano-filler, together with the uniform dispersion and/or moderate aggregation of the nano-filler. The nanocomposite resins filled with surface-modified TiO2 nanoparticle shows a great potential as dental restorative material.


Keynote Speaker

K.V.Arun kumar
Subharti Dental College & Hospital, INDIA
Title: Oral Fungal infections and their management -A clinical experience

Biography: Dr.K.V.Arunkumar, has completed his graduation from kuvempu university and post graduation from Rajiv Gandhi Health University, Karnataka, INDIA. He has a 16 years of experience in teaching and performing nearly all spectrum of head and neck surgeries. He is presently the Co-ordinator for the post graduate studies in subharti university, India. He is an active academician with nearly 60 national and international publications and invited Key note/ Guest speaker at specialty national conferences, CME and CDE’s. Avid reviewer for various national specialty journals and life member for state, national dental and specialty associations of repute.

Abstract: Abstract: World Health Organisation estimates 25% of the total 57 million annual deaths that occur worldwide are caused by microbes. Joshua Lederberg and Robert Shope identified the emerging microbial threats and attributed to the emergence of new pathogens due to microbial evolution and adaptation. The Darwin’s theory based on observation alone and discovery of genetics known as "modern evolutionary synthesis" together best explains the natural selection process by mutations as the raw material on which the evolution acts. Emerging and reemerging diseases caused by multi-resistant organisms constitute the major threats in India and around the globe. Here we discuss few forgotten opportunistic microbes causing diseases in patients and their management.


Keynote Speaker

Deepa D
Subharti Dental college and hospital, India
Title: Interdisciplinary approach in the management of complex cases with compromised periodontal support in anterior aesthetic zone.

Biography: Dr. Deepa D has completed her BDS from Kuvempu University and Masters of Dental Surgery in the speciality of Periodontology from Rajiv Gandhi University of Health sciences, Karnataka, India. Presently, working as Professor at Subharti University, India. She has worked as co-investigator for World Health Organisation research project. Has 17 scientific presentations at National and 2 at international conferences. Awarded –Best scientific presentation at the National evidence based dentistry conference, Gujarat, India and also National awards three times for essay competition during 2003, 2008 and 2016. She is an active academician and has published 64 papers in national and international journals and has been serving as reviewer in journals of repute. Invited guest speaker at academic events. She is also a life member of reputed speciality organisations of periodontology and implantology.

Abstract: Background: Rising public interest in developing and maintaining a healthy attractive smile has led to a greater understanding of the interrelationships in dentistry. However, dental treatment of patients with compromised periodontal support and aesthetics are complex and challenging. Objective: To achieve significant periodontal, aesthetic and functional improvements. Methodology: Diverse clinical scenarios where periodontal treatment combined with Orthognathic surgery, and periodontal treatment with orthodontic treatment and dento-alveolar procedures, and combination approach of ortho- perio -endo treatments are discussed. Thorough, systematic and sequential treatment planning and execution is necessary to create the foundation for long term, predictable periodontal and aesthetic success. Conclusion: This case series describes the benefits of an interdisciplinary approach to the successful management of complex cases with compromised periodontal support and aesthetics.


Orthodontics

Session Introduction

Enza Robotti
Università degli Studi di Cagliari, Italy
Title: Improving the Efficiency of Treatment in Class Two Patients

Biography: Enza Robotti has completed her degree with honors in dentistry and dental implants at the age of 24 from Genoa University and postdoctoral studies from Cagliari University School of Orthodontics. He is the director of two private practice in Ventimiglia and in Bordighera, which is mainly engaged in child dentistry. She performed oral communications in national and international conferences concerning children's dentistry and orthodontics. World Federation Orthodontist Member.

Abstract: Aims/Objectives: The aim of this work is to evaluate how using a silicon appliance with fixed therapy will improve the efficiency of treatment in Class Two patients quickly and easily Method: We treated different cases of Class Two with silicon appliances and brackets and discovered that we were able to treat the patients much quicker and more easily using these together arches. Results The treatment time was reduced and after two months malocclusion was improved dramatically. Discussion/Conclusion In conclusion it is better to use multibracket therapy with a silicon appliance as shown in our research


Christoph von Mandach
Private Practice,Switzerland
Title: The C-Bracket: a Proposal for a new Orthodontic Appliance

Biography: Christoph von Mandach has completed his PhD in 1980 from Dental School of the University of Bern, Switzerland, postdoctoral studies from Department of Preventive, Restorative and Pediatric Dentistry and Department of Orthodontics. He earned the degree as Orthodontist SSO in 1990. He headed an office for dental care and orthodontics in Brugg, Switzerland for about 30 years. He holds several patents on brackets

Abstract: To aquaint and explain the implementation of six principal improvements of the edgewise bracket. The C-Bracket is not a single peace but a kit system, consisting of various utilities out of high performance material. 1. In order to reduce the size, a solution without a bracket body was found. A sheet of cobalt-chronium alloy with a small bending in occlusal direction and a second, larger bending in gingival direction takes all functions as an attachement. 2. A special forming of the wings allows the mounting of elastics either by the doctor or the patient without the need of a hook. 3. Exchangeable insets form precise slots for all commen used wires from 0.2 mm (.007”) round wires up to square wires 0.55mm x 0.62mm (.022” x .025”). 4. The exchangeable insets permit a free choice of the torque value at any tooth and at any time. Torque needs no more formed into the wire. 5. Diverse utilities as bracketholders and various pointers are designed for a pricise bonding on the tooth, both on the buccal and the lingual side, as well as for assisting the indirect bonding. 6. Additives may be insert to provide a perfect alginate impression and furthermore a good oral hygiene and a godd aesthetic view in combination with aligner treatments.


Christoph von Mandach
Switzerland
Title: The Edgewise-Bracket by Edward H. Angle, - is it still up to date?

Biography: Christoph von Mandach has completed his PhD in 1980 from Dental School of the University of Bern, Switzerland, postdoctoral studies from Department of Preventive, Restorative and Pediatric Dentistry and Department of Orthodontics. He earned the degree as Orthodontist SSO in 1990. He headed an office for dental care and orthodontics in Brugg, Switzerland for about 30 years. He holds several patents on brackets

Abstract: Introduction: Ninety years of research and experience in the edgewise bracket did not yet lead to standardised steps in the treatment, as for example aligners do. A great diversity of sliding mechanics, segmented arch teniques and temporary achorage devices make difficult to understand, how edgewise brackets work and what kind of improvements may reduce the effort and time of treatments. Objective: To assess and implement the profile of improvements for a novel bracket design. Six points will be discussed: 1. The reduction of the bracket profile on the hight of the Andrews plane below 1mm 2. To fix elastics by the orthodontist or by the patient without accessory hooks 3. The bracket slot is eligible after bonding. The variety of the cross sections is based on common used wires from small round wires to square wires 0.45mm x 0.55mm (.018” x .022”) and 0.55mm x 0.62mm (.022’’ x .025’’), 4. The torque value is eligible at any tooth and at any time. 5. Auxillary means as bracketholders and pointers assist the positioning of the brackets either direct buccally and lingually or by indirect bonding. 6. The bracket can be combined with aligner treatments. The implementation of all points will be shown.


Eman Alnamnakani
Prince Sultan Military Medical City, Saudi Arabia
Title: TEAM-ORIENTED CARE FOR OROFACIAL CLEFTS IN SAUDI ARABIA

Biography: Eman Alnamnakani is Consultant Orthodontist in Prince Sultan Military Medical City (PSMMC), Program Director in Saudi Orthodontic Board in (PSMMC), Head of Clinical Cases Review Committee in Saudi Orthodontic Board, Head of Cleft Lip and palate unit in PSMMC2,Board member in Saudi Orthodontic Society. Eman received Bachelor of Dental Surgery from King Saud University in1997, Clinical Certification in Orthodontics from King Saud University in 2003, Master degree in dental science in 2004, Saudi Board in Orthodontics in 2009, and Diploma of Membership in Orthodontics in the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh in 2010.

Abstract: Non-syndromic orofacial clefting (NSOFC), including isolated cleft lip (CL), cleft lip and palate (CLP), and isolated cleft palate (CP), is the most common craniofacial defect worldwide with an estimated mean global prevalence of 1.25/1000 live births. However, the prevalence of NSOFC varies geographically and across different ethnic groups. A small number of studies have measured the prevalence of NSOFC in Saudi Arabia and neighboring countries with the reported prevalence ranging from 0.3 to 2.19/1000 births. The aetiology of Non-Syndromic Orofacial Clefts (NSOFC) including cleft lip with/or without cleft palate (CL±P) and isolated cleft palate (CP) are complex. A combination of risk factors contribute to its aetiology; genetics, environmental and gene-environmental interaction. The number of genes involved, the variation in CL±P, CP and its sub-phenotypes, the type of inheritance patterns compounded by interaction with environmental factors, and the ethnic and geographic variations, make it challenging to identify causal factors. The care for individuals with Clefts requires interdisciplinary team. The principal role of the interdisciplinary team is to provide integrated case management to assure quality and continuity of patient care and longitudinal follow- up. Each patient seen by the team requires comprehensive, interdisciplinary treatment planning to achieve maximum habilitation with efficient use of parent and patient time and resources. Infant feeding must be addressed; later speech must be dealt with in a timely manner, seeking every opportunity to enhance the development of normal speech. Another major concern is esthetics; significant goals of the team include maximizing esthetic results and also facilitating the development of the orofacial complex. The orthodontist has proven to be an essential partner in the cleft palate team. Patients with orofacial clefts required orthodontic treatment at any or all four different stages: Neonatal maxillary orthopedics, orthodontic treatment during the deciduous dentition, mixed dentition, and permanent dentition.


John Nesan
Center For Technology Assisted Reconstructive Surgery (CTARS), India
Title: Role of 3d printing in reconstructive surgery of the head and neck region

Biography: Dr.N. John Nesan Director – Centre for Technology Assisted Reconstructive Surgery (CTARS) Pvt Ltd. , is a oral & maxillofacial surgeon by profession with a Chain of 4 dental clinics in Chennai. He has over 10 years of experience in working with Rapid prototyping being associated with brand leaders like Materialise and 3DSystems. He is also a member of the Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons of India, International Congress of Oral Implantologists, and Indian Society of Oral Implantologist. His passion is to bring the best in technology to needing patients in India. He is actively promoting the applications of 3D printing to the healthcare community. His core focus is on Patient Specific Implants (Titanium) in the head and neck region.

Abstract: Three-dimensional printing represents an evolving technology that is fast growing and finding new applications in heathcare. Application of the 3D printing technique are not just restricted to hard tissues but are now extending to bio-cell printing for 3D tissue/organ development, the creation of scaffolds for tissue engineering, and actual clinical application for various medical parts. Of various medical fields, the head and neck region is one of areas that have seen it use being explored much. Currently in reconstructive surgeries of the head and neck, autogenous bone is still the gold standard. But even this technique has deficiencies in form, function, and esthetics for the restored regions. This presentation will explore the potential uses of three-dimensional designing and printing by CTARS to restore defects of the head and neck region that would normally have been a challenge to surgeons to restore.


Caroline Martins Gambardela-Tkacz
University of Sao Paulo, Brazil
Title: Comparative study of the dental arch shape in young Brazilians with normal occlusion

Biography: Dr. Caroline Gambardela-Tkacz is from Brazil and has completed her degree of MSc in orthodontics at Bauru Dental School - University of Sao Paulo.

Abstract: Aim: This study was developed to determine the normative values of dental arch length and width and to identify the shapes of the dental arches of Brazilians with normal occlusion. Methods: The sample included 100 digitized dental casts from untreated subjects with normal occlusion divided by ethnic groups. The dimensions and shapes of the dental arches were determined and compared. Results: Japanese women had the largest distances in the lower and upper posterior variables among all groups. White men presented the smallest transverse dimensions. Black men had the largest maxillary dimensions except for intermolar width. The arch shape of the Japanese-Brazilian women was the narrowest at the molar area. Mulatto men had the largest dental arches in the anterior area. Conclusions: According to the results obtained, there was a slight variation in the shapes of dental arches between ethnic groups. Individual and ethnic characteristics in treatment should be considered.


Maen Mahfouz
Department of Orthodontics, National Specialized Dental Center, Ministry of Health,Saudi Arabia
Title: Ethical Dilemmas in Orthodontics

Biography: Dr. Maen Mahfouz received his DDS degree in 1998 from Al-Ba’ath University in Humus, Syria , received his MDS and Specialty in Orthodontics - Pediatric Dentistry in 2003 from Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt , certified by Palestinian Medical Council (Palestinian Board in Orthodontics) (2005) , certified by Saudi commission for health specialties(Professional Accreditation Certificate in Orthodontics)(2014) and is currently an orthodontist at Ministry of Health - Saudi Arabia. He was an orthodontist at dental department- Alzafer hospital -Najran -Saudi Arabia and was a former lecturer at the Dental faculty - Arab American University- Jenin, Palestine. He is a member in Palestinian Orthodontic Society (POS) ,a member in Arab Orthodontic Society (AOS) and a fellow of World Federation of orthodontists (WFO). He is interested in researches in Orthodontics ,Orthognathic Surgery, Skeletal Anchorage and Smile Design. He has shared many of international conferences in different countries. He is an author and reviewer of several published papers in international reputed journals.

Abstract: Aim: To present a clinical case as an example of an ethical dilemma that orthodontists may face when advocating for the best interests of a child. Case Presentation: A five-year-old girl attended my private orthodontic clinic with a main complaint of lower anterior teeth overlapping her upper anterior teeth. She was in the primary dentition stage. There was a conflict between the orthodontist’s interests of the child and the need to respect parental autonomy. Her mother had doubts and misgivings about the effectiveness of orthodontic treatment and was reluctant to have her daughter begin treatment at this age. Discussion: Factually, there are ethical problems continuously encountered by orthodontists during orthodontic interventions, even though there are important human values at stake in the course of treatment. These values may include preventing pain, maintaining and restoring oral function for normal speech and eating, preserving and restoring the patient’s physical appearance, and promoting a sense of control over and responsibility for one’s own health. Last but definitely not least, orthodontists deal largely with children, and ethical problems arise especially when there is moral uncertainty. Conclusion: The ethical traditions and codes of conduct of medicine and dentistry require orthodontists to act in the interest of their patients regardless of financial arrangements, and even, at times, with risk to themselves. In the case of children, this interest in the patient becomes even more pronounced and may conflict with the orthodontist’s interests to respect the wishes of the patient.


Ajit Kalia
M.A.Rangoonwala Dental College, India
Title: Aesthetic Considerations In Orthodontics

Biography: Dr. Ajit Kalia is currently PROFESSOR & HEAD at Department of Orthodontics M.A. Rangoonwala College of Dental Sciences and Research Center, Pune India. He is a post-graduate teacher and has 15 years of active teaching experience. He completed his MDS from Ragas Dental College, Chennai under the guidance of Dr. N. R. Krishnaswamy. He is also “Diplomate of the Indian Board of Orthodontics”. He has lectured at various national and international conferences and has got publications at National & International Level. He has keen interest in temporary anchorage device, micro esthetics and LASERs

Abstract: Aristotle said "Beauty is a greater recommendation than any letter of introduction". A statement that is true nowadays where attractive people have a much better chance of being successful. Aesthetic concerns continue to remain at the forefront for a significant segment of patients seeking orthodontic treatment. Orthodontists can greatly contribute to enhancing patient's smile, appearance, and subsequently self-confidence. Appearance is undoubtedly the most important motivating factor for orthodontic patients whether it is termed “facial appearance”, “dental appearance” or “straight teeth”. ‘Dental aesthetics' is defined by the way things are perceived visually. The role of the orthodontist in resolving the patient's dental and facial aesthetic concerns is a challenge due to the number of factors to be evaluated. The effect of growth and aging, and the existing dental, gingival, dentoalveolar, skeletal, and facial soft tissue components mandate a thorough investigation into all treatment options and modalities available to reach optimal aesthetic goals. The orthodontist is further challenged with professional bias and patient bias and desires. Improvement in appearance is the primary reason that adults seek orthodontic care. Proper recognition of the dental and facial aesthetic defects at the outset of treatment is the most important key to aesthetic success and is, therefore, essential to satisfying the patients' needs. For the adult patient, optimizing treatment involves an interdisciplinary approach necessary to evaluate, diagnose, and resolve aesthetic problems using a combination of orthodontic, endodontic, periodontic and prosthodontic treatment. With proper planning, the challenge of reaching dental and facial aesthetic goals can be met without compromising the functional occlusal goals, periodontal health, TMJ health, and long term stability. This presentation outlines the adjunctive protocols in orthodontics to enhance aesthetics post orthodontic treatment.


Majed Hatem
Maktoun Bin Hamdan Dental University College, UAE
Title:

Biography:

Abstract: Gingival hyper pigmentation has become an important concern for major number of young people nowadays. Although medical problems are not seen, but smile with display of black gums makes the appearance very unaesthetic and is seen excess in patients with gummy smile. It is caused by excessive melanin pigment deposition secreted by melanocytes situated in supra basal and basal cell layers of epithelium. The latest treatment modality for gingival hyper pigmentation is use of lasers for de-pigmentation because of its innumerable advantages over conventional scalpel techniques. Hereby we report a cases on the cosmetic correction of gingival de pigmentation using a diode laser using special technique which shows an excellent results. We call this new technique as “MBH jet print de-pigmentation”. This new technique represents an alternative ones compared to the conventional shaving where part of the gum needs to be removed. With jet print technique, laser selectively destroys the target melanocytes (absorption and scattering) to produce the de-pigmentation without local anesthesia, antibiotic and periodontal pack. Up to our knowledge, we believe that no one used this technique before. In conclusion, MBH jet print de-pigmentation is safe, quick and pain free technique with excellent hemostasis and coagulation. The healing was excellent with optimum aesthetic result.


Con O keeffe
O`Keeffe Orthodontics Hospital, Ireland
Title:

Biography:

Abstract: ‘’Contemporary Orthodontics using Age Appropriate Treatment Planning to enhance our SMILE Contemporary orthodontic treatment planning must be age appropriate , must understand and consider the effects of ageing on our facial hard and soft tissues and smile over time and fashion treatments accordingly. A series of cases will be shown of age appropriate treatments illustrating all of the above. The cases can be viewed on powerpoint in dropbox’’


Endodontics

Session Introduction

Sohrab tour savadkouhi
Assistant professor, Endodontics Department, Dental Branch, Islamic Azad University of Tehran/ Iran
Title: Tooth discoloration induced by MTA based materials

Biography: Dr. Sohrab Tour Savadkouhi is an Assistant Professor in Islamic Azad University. He has received his Endodontics degree at Shahid Beheshti University of medical science and his M.S of Endodontics at Islamic Azad University of Tehran.

Abstract: Endodontic therapy may not focus only on biological and functional aspects, but should take esthetic considerations into account as well. It is common knowledge that MTA based materials may cause discoloration and thus impair the esthetic outcome of the treated tooth. The purpose of this review is to summarize the existing knowledge on the discoloration potential of these materials used for endodontic procedures


Rashid Elabed
Mohammed Bin Rashid University of Medicine and Health Sciences
Title: Effects of Pitch Length and Heat Treatment on the mechanical Properties of the Glide Path Preparation Instruments

Biography: Dr. Rashid Elabed did his Jordanian Board of Endodontics in 2008. Currently working as Endodontic specialist in Mohammed Bin Rashid University of Medicine and Health Sciences (MBRU) in Dubai United Arab Emirates; Holds a practice limited in endodontics ; lectured and conducted hands-on endodontics courses worldwide and has contributed to several endodontic publications as author, co author and peer reviewer. His research intrest includes, cell biology and stem cell research, gene therapy.

Abstract: This study aimed to compare the effects of pitch length and heat treatment on the mechanical properties of glide path establishing instruments. Methods: Prototypes of glide path preparation files (#14/.03 taper) were made to evaluate the effects of different pitch lengths and heat treatments. The files were divided into 4 groups according to the pitch length (pG and OneG) and heat treatment (pGH and OneGH). For the torsional resistance test, ultimate strength and fracture angle were measured, and the file tip was fixed at 3 different levels of 2, 4, and 6 mm from the tip (n=10 for each level). The toughness was calculated by multiplying the ultimate strength and the fracture angle. The cyclic fatigue resistance was compared by measuring the number of cycles to fracture in a curved metal canal (n = 10). The screw-in forces were measured during instrumentation motions with a sequential increase in the pecking distance of 1mm until the file reached the end of the simulated resin canal (n=10). Results: The heat-treated groups showed lower toughness and higher cyclic fatigue resistance than the non–heat-treated groups. The short pitch groups showed significantly higher torsional strengths than the long pitch groups. The heat-treated groups had significantly lower screw-in forces than the non–heat-treated groups. Conclusions: Under the limitations of this study, the torsional strength of the experimental file was reduced by heat treatment and increased by the short pitch length. Thus, a non–heat-treated file with a shorter pitch length would be favorable as a rotary glide path instrument.


Mohammed Sulaiman

Title: An in vitro study to compare the sealing ability of different matched single-cone obturation systems Using Glucose leakage test

Biography:

Abstract: Root canal obturation can be time consuming and complicated. New filling systems such as Smartseal and GuttaFlow®2were suggested for use with a simple, single cone obturating technique. Seventy human maxillary central incisors were selected and their crowns were cut to give approximately 15 mm of root length from the coronal surface to the apex of the root. The root canals were instrumented using crown down technique and divided into six experimental groups (n=10) and positive and negative control groups (n=5). The experimental groups were filled as follow: Group 1, lateral compaction gutta-percha+ AH plus®; Group 2, single cone gutta-percha+ AH plus®; Group 3,single cone gutta-percha + GuttaFlow®2; Group 4, single cone RealSeal™ (Resilon) point + RealSeal SE™; Group 5, single cone ProPoint + SmartPastsealer; Group 6, single cone ProPoint + SmartPastebio sealer. All samples were stored for one week and the long-term leakage along the entire root canal filling was measured at 1, 8, 15, 22 and 29 days using glucose leakage model. With the leakage test device, coronal 1 mol/L glucose solution was forced under a hydrostatic pressure of 1.5 kPa toward the apical part of the root which immersed in an apical reservoir containing 0.2% sodium azide. Leakage was measured by calculating the concentration of leaked glucose (mg/dl) in apical reservoir with the enzymatic glucose oxidase method using spectrophotometer device. Glucose reactivity test with the materials used in the current study was performed by inserting discs set sealers and pieces of core materials in test tubes containing glucose solution, another test tubes containing the same glucose solution but without test materials were used as control. After one week the glucose concentrations in the solutions were measured by spectrophotometer device, any significant decrease in glucose concentration in experimental test tubes indicated glucose reaction with the materials. Differences of glucose concentrations within and between the experimental groups were statistically analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis and Man-Whitney tests. The level of significance was set at p < 0 .05.


Mostafa
The British University in Egypt
Title: Evaluation of Single File Concept in Retreatment of Endodontically Treated Teeth

Biography: Mostafa Anwar is an Assistant Lecturer of Endodontics at the Faculty of Dentistry, The British University in Egypt. He is also Infection Control Officer at the British University Dental Hospital. He is a Certified Healthcare & Hospital Management Specialist – AUC. He took a Master Degree of Endodontics from Ain Shams University in Egypt. His practice is limited to Micro-Endodontics. He is a Lecturer & Participant in many International Dental Conferences. He conducts many Lectures and Hands-on workshops on Endodontics all over Egypt. He is an Endodontics Specialist at Whity Dental Center, in Cairo (Egypt)

Abstract: In this study One Shape file (OS) was compared to R-Endo file (RE) in retreatment of endodontically treated teeth in terms of time required for completion of retreatment procedure and amount of remaining gutta-percha on root canal dentin. Methods: Sixty mandibular mesio-buccal canals with angles of curvature between 15 and 45 degrees were prepared using Protaper Universal rotary files then obturated using gutta-percha and AH-Plus sealer. Canals were then divided equally into 2 groups according to the retreatment system. Time required to reach the full working length (T1) and for complete removal of gutta-percha (T2) were measured during retreatment procedure using a digital stopwatch. Also the amount of remaining gutta-percha on the root canal dentin was measured using Stereomicroscopic images analyzed by Image J software. Results: OS group recorded statistically significant less time required for retreatment and less amount of remaining gutta-percha than RE group. As for the effect of Retreatment system on the percentage of remaining filling material regardless of canal curvature and Canal third: There was statistically significant difference between (R-Endo) (47.61 ± 7.27) and (One Shape) (35.01 ± 5.77) where (p<0.0001). The lowest mean percentage of remaining filling material was shown in (One Shape) (35.01 ± 5.77). As for the effect of retreatment system on time required for retreatment regardless of canal curvature and (T1 and T2): There was statistically significant difference between (R-Endo) (46.41 ±2.86) and (One Shape) (35.12 ±6.57) where (p=0.007). The lowest mean time was shown in (One Shape) (35.12 ±6.57).


Shahriar
Professor, Head of Dental and Periodontal Research Center.
Title: compare the effect of two different rotary instruments on postoperative pain in teeth with asymptomatic irreversible pulpitis.

Biography: Professor, Head of Dental and Periodontal Research Center, Head of Endodontics Department, faculty of Dentistry, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IRAN

Abstract: The aim of the present study was to compare the effect of two different rotary instruments on postoperative pain in teeth with asymptomatic irreversible pulpitis. Methods and Materials: A total of 78 mandibular first and second molars were divided into two groups (n=39) and their root canal preparation was carried out with either RaCe or ProTaper rotary instruments. All the subjects underwent one-visit root canal treatment and the severity of postoperative pain was evaluated using visual analog scale (VAS) at 4-, 12-, 24-, 48- and 72-h and 1-week intervals. In addition, the need for taking analgesics was recorded. Data were analyzed with the repeated-measures ANOVA and the Mann-Whitney U test was used for two-by-two comparison. Statistical significance was set at 0.05. Results: Comparison of mean pain severity between the two groups at various postoperative intervals did not reveal any significant differences (P=0.10). The difference in amount of analgesics taken by each groups was not statistically significant (P=0.25). Conclusion: There were no significant differences in the postoperative pain reported between the two groups; which indicates the clinical acceptability of both systems.


Other

Session Introduction

Ahmed A H Hindy
PhD researcher, Dept. of Dental Biomaterials, Shahid Baheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran - IRAN
Title: Biological Properties of Laser Processed Titanium Dental Implant

Biography: Biography : -PhD researcher, Dept. of Dental Biomaterials, Shahid Baheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran - IRAN -M.Sc., Laser Applications in Dentistry (Oro-Facial Laser Surgery) 2002. University of Baghdad-IRAQ -Bachelors in Dental and Oral Surgery (B.D.S.) 1992. University of Baghdad-IRAQ -Diploma Oral Implantology 2011. University Clinical of Freiburg - GERMANY -Associate Fellow - Implant Dentistry 2011. American Academy of Implant Dentistry(AAID)- USA

Abstract: Abstract: Objective: Dental Implant biomaterial must have good biocompatibility, and a highly porous and interconnected structure to allow cell migration or ingrowth. Our goal is to review laser processed dental implants regarding their biological properties. Materials and Methods: The PubMed database was searched in English language using the keywords: “Biological response, Laser, Titanium Dental Implant” from 2000 to 2015. The studies, in which biological properties of laser processed titanium dental implants were evaluated, were selected. Results: Todays, laser Ti processing are widely applied in the most sophisticated devices, in both commercial and purely scientific purposes, and can be attributed to several unique advantages of laser, namely, high productivity, automation worthiness, noncontact processing, less finishing operation, reduced processing cost, improved product quality, and greater material utilization. The most recent application of laser in material processing is development of rapid prototyping technologies, where, lasers have been coupled with computer aided engineering design to enable new capability. Conclusion: Cells cultured on Laser processed Ti implant material had a tendency towards increased cellular attachment, proliferation, and differentiation


Karem M. Ibrahim
Egyptian-German Dentist.
Title: Prosthetic Soft Tissue Management

Biography: Karem is an Egyptian-German Dentist, that has been working as a specialist for surgical and prosthetic Oral Implantology for the past five years. Co-founder of Presidentalesthetics dental center 2008, currently extended to two dental centers and two all ceramic dental Labs working mainly with the CAD-CAM technology. As well as being a clinician for surgical & prosthetic implantology in the private sector, he is also involved in the academic sector related to the science of oral implantology. Karem has been working as a lecturer for oral implantology at the continuing education department Misr International University (MIU) since 2008. Also active as a clinical instructor for surgical and prosthetic implantology at the MIU hospital since 2009. Currently course director and program coordinator for the implantology continuing education programs. Also the representative of the German Society for Oral Implantology in Egypt since 2010. Currently there are three continuing educational programs running in Egypt under the name of the Greman Society for Oral Implantology. Lecture in numerous courses and congress .

Abstract: Subject Title: Prosthetic Soft Tissue Management The esthetic & prosthetic soft tissue management has gained tremendously in importance over the last decade, not only due to the contemporary clinical techniques , evidence based investigations & technological innovation , but primarily due to the increased awareness of our patients and the high esthetic expectations in the prosthetics we deliver. Our patients expect naturally looking restorations with minimal invasive therapies and this in a time-and cost-effective manner. An ideal implant treatment plan utilizes procedures, techniques, materials and technologies that leads fast and on the shortest way to a maximized esthetic result.


Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

Session Introduction

Zafrulla Khan
J.G.Brown Cancer Center, USA
Title: : Dental Considerations in Head and Neck Radiation and Chemotherapy Cancer Patients

Biography: Dr. Khan is a Diplomate of the American Board of Prosthodontics, Fellow of the American College of Prosthodontics and American Academy of Maxillofacial Prosthetics. He recieved his Dental Degree from Bangalore University, India and Masters in Oral Biology from University of Louisville. Completed Residency in Prosthodontics at State University of New York at Buffalo, NY.and Fellowship in Maxillofacial Prosthetics and Dental Oncology from University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX. He is Professor at University of Louisville, Kentucky and Adjunct Professor at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, Boston, MA. His previous appointments included Director of Post graduate Prosthodontics and Chairman, Department of Prosthodontics at University of Louisville, Dental School. He holds Active Medical Staff appointments and member of cancer committee at multiple Hospitals in Louisville, KY. Editorial Review Board Member of several prosthodontic journals. His research interests include head and neck cancer and dental materials. Principal Investigator of several studies and secured grants over three million dollars. He is an Invited Speaker at many Local, National and International Meetings. He has received various Honors and Induction in Scientific Honor Societies. Dr. Khan is active in multiple Professional, Research and Specialty Organizations.

Abstract: Head and Neck cancer patients treated with Radiation and Chemotherapy may encounter side effects like xerostomia, mucositis, radiation caries, osteoradionecrosis etc. Early diagnosis, prevention and appropriate treatment will improve the quality of life for these patients. All oral health care providers can play a role caring for head and neck cancer patients; by Pretreatment evaluation, Early detection/prevention of oral and dental complications; Reducing the risk and severity of oral complications and Treatment including follow up strategies.


John Neson
Director at Centre for Technology Assisted Reconstructive Surgery (CTARS) Pvt Ltd
Title: ROLE OF 3D PRINTING IN RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY OF THE HEAD AND NECK REGION

Biography: Dr.N. John Nesan Director – Centre for Technology Assisted Reconstructive Surgery (CTARS) Pvt Ltd. , is a oral & maxillofacial surgeon by profession with a Chain of 4 dental clinics in Chennai. He has over 10 years of experience in working with Rapid prototyping being associated with brand leaders like Materialise and 3DSystems. He is also a member of the Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons of India, International Congress of Oral Implantologists, and Indian Society of Oral Implantologist. His passion is to bring the best in technology to needing patients in India. He is actively promoting the applications of 3D printing to the healthcare community. His core focus is on Patient Specific Implants (Titanium) in the head and neck region.

Abstract: Three-dimensional printing represents an evolving technology that is fast growing and finding new applications in heathcare. Application of the 3D printing technique are not just restricted to hard tissues but are now extending to bio-cell printing for 3D tissue/organ development, the creation of scaffolds for tissue engineering, and actual clinical application for various medical parts. Of various medical fields, the head and neck region is one of areas that have seen it use being explored much. Currently in reconstructive surgeries of the head and neck, autogenous bone is still the gold standard. But even this technique has deficiencies in form, function, and esthetics for the restored regions. This presentation will explore the potential uses of three-dimensional designing and printing by CTARS to restore defects of the head and neck region that would normally have been a challenge to surgeons to restore.


Henri Diederich
Dental Clinic Henri Diederich - Luxembourg
Title: FIXED REHABILITATION OF SEVERELY ATROPHIC JAWS USING THE CORTICALLY FIXED AT ONCE CF@O APPROACH

Biography: Scientific Studies Certificate, University of Luxembourg 1979 •Degree in Dentistry, Free University of Brussels (ULB) 1985 •Post-Grad. Diploma Legal Dentistry (D.U. expertise, personal injury, identifications) Thesis: L’implantologie crestale et basale dans le cadre du consentement éclairé (Informed Consent in Crestal and Basal Implantology) University of Montpellier I 2009 •Post-Grad. Diploma Personal Injury (D.U.E.D.C.O. Assessment in Odontology) Thesis: The Cranio-mandibular Dysfunction and Orofacial Pain. University of Montpellier I 2010

Abstract: When there is loss of teeth ,atrophy of the alveolar processes occurs in a vertical as well in a horizontal plane. The term ATROPHY is defined in the dictionary as a “wasting away”, a diminution in the size of a cell, tissue, organ or part. When this process starts, it continues throughout the patients life because of the lack of stimuli (disuse atrophy) seen on alveolar process of the jaws. Implant placement in severely atrophic jaws is especially challenging because of the poor quality and quantity of the future implant bed. Calvarial or iliac bone grafts, mental nerve displacement and sinus lift procedures are often used to overcome the initially unfavourable anatomical and mechanical conditions. But despite acceptable success rates, these approaches involve unpredictable degrees of morbidity at the donor or recipient sites. Furthermore patients are sometimes reluctant to undergo such procedures. The Cortically Fixed at Once approach CF@O uses the remaining bone for fixing cortical implants. The specificity of this protocol is that no graft, no sinus lift and no nerve displacements are used. Specific implants plate shaped implants ranging in length from 41-43 mm are used in the extremely atrophic sectors to well manage these regions. The high fatigue strength of these solid titanium implants without any welds or added parts is particulary indicated for mechanically demanding situations ( the canine and zygomatic sectors of the maxilla ) and the mandibular ramus. In this way severe atrophies may be rehabilitated within 10 days with a fixed denture. The Cortically Fixed at Once protocol is appliable to edentulous maxillaes and mandibles, to unilateral edentulisme in maxilla and mandible to bilateral edentulism in maxilla and mandible ndible. All these is illustrated in the case reports and the follow up over the years.


Ahmed Mahrous
El Minia university Hospital, Egypt
Title: High cervical versus miniretromandibular and preauricular anteroparotid transmasseteric approaches for condylar fracture repair

Biography:

Abstract: AIM: The aim of this work was to find out the best transmasseteric approach from the three approaches that has been described sporadically in the literature ,namely the high cervical , the miniretromandibular and the preauricular anteroparotid one. PATIENTS: Sixty patients had extracapsular fracture condyle and associated with malocclusion were classified into three groups A-B &-C. Each group included twenty patients repaired by one of the three approaches.The accessibility,the stability of occlusion,the facial nerve condition,the salivary complications and the final esthetics were studied in each group. RESULTS:The high cervical approach was associated with the best accessibility and the lowest complication rate as compared with other approaches. ONCLUSIONS: Its advisable to utilize the high cervical approach when dealing with the condylar fractures.


Albraa B. Alolayan
Taibah University, Saudi Arabia
Title: Infra-orbital nerve recovery after maxillary orthognathic surgery

Biography: Dr. Albraa Alolayan graduated with bachelor of dental surgery from king Abdul-Aziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Then he joined Hong Kong University and awarded with masters of dental surgery and advanced diploma in oral and maxillofacial surgery. He did his oral and maxillofacial surgery residency training in Queen Mary hospital and Prince Philip dental hospital, Hong Kong. He is a member of the royal college of surgeons of Edinburgh (OMFS). His research interest includes, orthognathic surgeries and traumatology. Currently he is the chairman of oral and maxillofacial surgery department, Faculty of Dentistry, Taibah University, Madinah, Saudi Arabia.

Abstract: Purpose: To define the infra-orbital nerve recovery and to investigate the risk factors that might contribute to the incidence neurosensory disturbances after maxillary orthognathic surgeries. Method: A prospective observational study was carried out on patients who underwent orthognathic surgery between 2012 and 2013. Patients were divided into three groups according to the maxillary surgical procedures: Neurosensory function was assessed by subjective assessment and three objective testing modalities. Possible risk factors including subjects’ age, gender, surgeons’ experiences, total time of the surgery and segmentation procedure of LeFort I osteotomy were recorded. Results: 48 patients with 96 sides. (17 male, 31 female) with mean age of 25.8 years (S.D. 6.3 years) were recruited. The incidences of neurosensory deficit for the infra-orbital region at 2 weeks, 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months and 1 year were 81.3%, 60.4%. 41.7%, 17.7% and 10.4% respectively. Objective testing approached preoperative levels as early as 6 weeks post operatively. There were no statistical differences in the incidences of neurosensory disturbances in relation to age, gender, surgeons’ experiences, total time of the surgery and segmentation procedures. Conclusions: Subjects with neurosensory disturbances of the infra-orbital nerve recovered from 81.3% to 10.4% within 1 year. Persistent neurosensory disturbances at 1 year rated mild by all subjects. Objectively all patients approached preoperative levels by 6 weeks post operatively. Age, gender, surgeons’ experiences, total time of the surgery and segmentation procedure of LeFort I osteotomy did not appear to influence the incidence of neurosensory deficit in maxillary procedures of orthognathic surgery.


Dr. K.V.Arunkumar
Subharti Dental College & Hospital, INDIA
Title: Oral Fungal infections and their management -A clinical experience

Biography: Dr.K.V.Arunkumar, has completed his graduation from kuvempu university and post graduation from Rajiv Gandhi Health University, Karnataka, INDIA. He has a 16 years of experience in teaching and performing nearly all spectrum of head and neck surgeries. He is presently the Co-ordinator for the post graduate studies in subharti university, India. He is an active academician with nearly 60 national and international publications and invited Key note/ Guest speaker at specialty national conferences, CME and CDE’s. Avid reviewer for various national specialty journals and life member for state, national dental and specialty associations of repute.

Abstract: World Health Organisation estimates 25% of the total 57 million annual deaths that occur worldwide are caused by microbes. Joshua Lederberg and Robert Shope identified the emerging microbial threats and attributed to the emergence of new pathogens due to microbial evolution and adaptation. The Darwin’s theory based on observation alone and discovery of genetics known as "modern evolutionary synthesis" together best explains the natural selection process by mutations as the raw material on which the evolution acts. Emerging and reemerging diseases caused by multi-resistant organisms constitute the major threats in India and around the globe. Here we discuss few forgotten opportunistic microbes causing diseases in patients and their management.


Biomaterial Science

Session Introduction

Ahmed A.H. Hindy
Department of Dental Biomaterials, School of Dentistry, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences.
Title: Functionally Graded Dental Implant

Biography: Biography : -PhD researcher, Dept. of Dental Biomaterials, Shahid Baheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran - IRAN -M.Sc., Laser Applications in Dentistry (Oro-Facial Laser Surgery) 2002. University of Baghdad-IRAQ -Bachelors in Dental and Oral Surgery (B.D.S.) 1992. University of Baghdad-IRAQ -Diploma Oral Implantology 2011. University Clinical of Freiburg - GERMANY -Associate Fellow - Implant Dentistry 2011. American Academy of Implant Dentistry(AAID)- USA

Abstract: Abstract Ever since modern dental implants were introduced more than 40 years ago, the development of the ideal implant has been a major research subject in the field. A good match of mechanical properties between Dental Implant biomaterial and human bone tissues is essential to achieve a successful osseointegration. Bone-implant interface researches are going into four directions: composites of biomaterials, coatings on metallic implants, tissue engineering, and recently, functionally graded material (FGM). Dental implants can be functionally graded to create an optimized mechanical behavior and achieve the intended bio-compatibility and osseointegration improvement. Mechanical properties improvement is highly important especially Young’s modulus as the high stiffness of Ti generally is not well-matched to bone, which can lead to stress shielding of the bone-implant interface, which in turn may result in detrimental resorption bone remodeling. FGM is a type of material whose composition is designed to change continuously within the solid, the concept is to make a composite material by varying the microstructure from one material to another material with a specific gradient. Also, the graded porosity another form of FGM dental implants showed an improved bone remodeling outcome since it implies the possibility to control the bone tissue response through the gradient function of FGM and controls the modulus that would reduce the stress shielding and enhance the osseointegration through normal bone remodeling.


Diagnosis and Prevention of Oral Disease

Session Introduction

ARUP RATAN
Department of, Dentistry Diabetic Association of Bangladesh
Title: Periodontal disease in diabetics and Serum C-reactive protein (CRP) values

Biography: Professor ARUP RATAN CHOUDHURY is a dedicated and self-motivated dentist . He is working in the field of dentistry since 1976 (36 Years). In 1987 he was invited to visit USA under the program of USIS (UNITED STATES INFORMATION SERVICE) on drug abuse prevention. He has done lot of research work in BIRDEM (WHO COLLABORATING CENTER) on dental health, Diabetes and tobacco hazards & already presented 38 Scientific papers in international seminars. He also published 11 books on Dentistry, AIDS, Tobacco hazards & Drug abuse and distributed in different school and colleges of Bangladesh for awareness among the students. At present he is the Professor & Hon. senior consultant of department of Dentistry in BIRDEM & also the founder president of MANAS. He is the member of national drug control board and national tobacco control task force

Abstract: Aims:To evaluate C-reactive protein values in diabetic persons with periodontal disease. Methods: 250 patients randomly selected from the dental out-patient department of BIRDEM. A questionnaire survey and clinical examination of periodontal status, including gingival bleeding, gingival inflammation and oral mucosa, to determine the person's periodontal health and treatment needs. Periodontal pocket depth measurement was done with a blunt periodontal probe . Grading was done at <3 mm and below as healthy periodontium and >3 mm as diseased condition – periodontitis ( Sensor probe - Dentec Type CP– 12 , marking 3- 6 – 912 ). Blood sample was collected for C- reactive protein values . Results: Shows C- reactive protein values of 32.8% males and 28.4% females are within the reference range (<6mg/L ), 6.4% males and 11.6% females presssented with moderately high level, (6- 20mg/L) , 4% males and 10.4% females presented with high level (21- 50mg/L ) and 2.8% males and 3.6% females presented with very high level (>50mg/L ) of C- reactive protein values . This relation found to be statiscally significant (p=0.0166). Distribution of sex among diabetic subjects with CRP values (<6mg/L ) & (>6mg/L ), 82 males (32.8%) & 71 females (28.4%) are within the reference range (<6mg/L ) and 33 males (13.2%) and 64 females (25.6%) are above the reference range (<6mg/L) .Study shows females are more predominant with higher C- reactive protein values & this relation found to be statistically significant (p=0.0025). Conclusion: High CRP values with periodontal disease is a predictor of coronary heart disease. Regular dental examination and routine scaling is essential for diabetic patients. This study is of interest to prevent coronary heart disease in diabetic subjects with periodontal disease but more studies with larger group of patients require to confirm this diagnosis.


Cosmetic Dentistry

Session Introduction

Mahmoud Ezzat Ghazi
International Academy of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry
Title: DIGITAL SMILE DESIGN

Biography: Dr. Mahmoud Ezzat received his BDS degree from the Faculty of Dental Medicine at Ain Shams University in Cairo, Egypt in 2002. He then attended a four year training program by the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh and received their membership degree in General Dental Surgery (MGDS RCSEd) in 2008. He then participated in the Membership in Restorative Dentistry (MRD) speciality training program supervised by the Royal College at Misr University, for his remarkable performance he was invited to become an instructor at this same program. In 2011 he was appointed Deputy MRD course director at Future University in Egypt for their postgraduate speciality program. He is the founder of the Diploma in Implant Dentistry training program awarded by the Royal college of Surgeons of Edinburgh. In 2013 he attained a Fellowship degree in Laser dentistry from the University of Genova Italy and has been lecturing on the subject ever since. In 2015 he attended several International DSD World tours and has reached the DSD Master level in DSD accreditations (1st DSD Master in Egypt) In August 2015 he co-lectured the DSD World Tour in Cairo, Egypt with DSD Founding Members Christian Coachman and Livio Yoshinaga and was elected DSD Lecturer. He is now part of the DSD International board as DSD Middle East Manager lecturing with Christian Coachman in the DSD Middle East Tour He keeps a full time private practice in Cairo specializing in Esthetic and Implant dentistry since 2004

Abstract: • Introduction o What is DSD? o Objectives • Design, Plan and Sell – The DSD Concept o 8 steps of the Smile Design Frame o Motivational mock-up (Emotional Dentistry) o DSD as a communicational tool o Digital Workflow - Connecting 2D to 3D (Ortho/CAD-CAM/Implant software)


Periodontology

Session Introduction

Dr. Deepa D
Subharti Dental college and hospital, India
Title: Interdisciplinary approach in the management of complex cases with compromised periodontal support in anterior aesthetic zone.

Biography: Dr. Deepa D has completed her BDS from Kuvempu University and Masters of Dental Surgery in the speciality of Periodontology from Rajiv Gandhi University of Health sciences, Karnataka, India. Presently, working as Professor at Subharti University, India. She has worked as co-investigator for World Health Organisation research project. Has 17 scientific presentations at National and 2 at international conferences. Awarded –Best scientific presentation at the National evidence based dentistry conference, Gujarat, India and also National awards three times for essay competition during 2003, 2008 and 2016. She is an active academician and has published 64 papers in national and international journals and has been serving as reviewer in journals of repute. Invited guest speaker at academic events. She is also a life member of reputed speciality organisations of periodontology and implantology.

Abstract: Background: Rising public interest in developing and maintaining a healthy attractive smile has led to a greater understanding of the interrelationships in dentistry. However, dental treatment of patients with compromised periodontal support and aesthetics are complex and challenging. Objective: To achieve significant periodontal, aesthetic and functional improvements. Methodology: Diverse clinical scenarios where periodontal treatment combined with Orthognathic surgery, and periodontal treatment with orthodontic treatment and dento-alveolar procedures, and combination approach of ortho- perio -endo treatments are discussed. Thorough, systematic and sequential treatment planning and execution is necessary to create the foundation for long term, predictable periodontal and aesthetic success. Conclusion: This case series describes the benefits of an interdisciplinary approach to the successful management of complex cases with compromised periodontal support and aesthetics.


Beklen Arzu
Osmangazi University, Turkey
Title: Cathepsin K in Periodontitis

Biography:

Abstract: Periodontitis is characterized by periodontal tissue destruction. The underlying pathogenesis is an inflammatory process involving innate and adaptive immune responses. Periodontitis is characterized by the host-mediated destruction of soft and hard tissue caused by production and activation of enzymes. Among these, cathepsin K is an enzyme for which an essential role in bone resorption has been unambiguously documented. Although it was believed that cathepsin K was specifically expressed in osteoclasts and critical for osteoclast-mediated bone resorption, recent evidence supports that Cathepsin K is synthesized by a variety of connective tissue cells as well. In this current study we aimed to study non-osteoclastic sources of cathepsin K in periodontitis. We optained tissue samples from systemically healthy periodontitis/non-periodontitis patients during the routine periodontal flap operations or the extraction operations for retained third molars, respectively. These samples were examined by immunohistochemistry, image analysis, immunofluorescence double-staining. For cell culture analysis we used gingival fibroblast cultures, tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) stimulation and Western blotting. The results revealed that macrophage-like cells, fibroblast-like cells, vascular endothelial cells and gingival epithelial cells were more intensively stained for cathepsin K and also more frequent in periodontitis group. (665 ± 104 vs 258 ± 40 cells mm2, periodontitis vs healthy, P < 0.01). Some cathepsin K(+) cells in periodontal tissues were CD68(+), but some were CD68(-) and probably fibroblasts. Fibroblasts released cathepsin K, more 43 kD procathepsin K than 29 kD active cathepsin K. Upon stimulation with TNF-α, the release of the activated cathepsin K was increased 4- to 5-fold. These results suggest that GCF-cathepsin K is not only osteoclast-derived, but in periodontitis, also other cells in the connective tissue contribute to it.