World Congress and Expo on
Nanotechnology and Materials Science
April 13-15, 2015, Dubai, UAE

Scientific Programme(Day 1 : Apr-13-2015)

Keynote Forum

Mehdi Anwar
University of Connecticut, USA
keynote: Zn1-xMgxO (x≤0.3) Nanostructures: A Versatile Material Platform for Advanced Electronics and Photonics
Biography:
Dr. Anwar is currently working on (a) ZnO Nanowire based UV detection and energy harvesting, (b) III-Nitrides and Oxide Semiconductor -based high power and high temperature quantum cascade lasers and (c) RF Oxide Semiconductor and III-Nitride HFETs and (d) memristors, to name a few. Dr. Anwar’s team pioneered the design of low noise antimony-based-compound-semiconductor (ABCS) HEMTs with quaternary buffer/barrier and ternary, with a measured fT around 200FGHz and Fmin of 0.82dB at 15GHz. He has presented over 40 plenary and invited talks at national/international conferences, published over 240 archival journal publications, conference proceedings and book chapters and edited 9 volumes. Dr. Anwar serves as an Editor of IEEE JEDS and served as an Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Electron Devices (2001 – 2010) and serves as the conference chair of the international conference on Terahertz Physics, Devices and Systems, at SPIE Defense, Security and Sensing (2009-2015). Dr. Anwar is an SPIE Fellow.

Abstract:
Zinc oxide (ZnO) and its associated nanostructures have been vigorously pursued for application in advanced electronics, UV detectors, chemical sensors and source for white light. The material with a bandgap of 3.37eV, that could be tailored by the addition on Mg or Co, is unique in being biocompatible and exhibiting both semiconducting and piezoelectric properties that grows in a diverse group of nanostructure morphologies. Highly ordered vertical arrays of ZnO nanowires (NWs) have been grown on substrates including silicon, SiO2, GaN, and sapphire using a metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) growth process. Co-axial core-shell nanostructures demonstrating unique properties with enhanced detectability of chemical species has been demonstrated. The research group at the University of Connecticut, has made great strides in the growth of both Zn1-xMgxO nanowires and nanorods to demonstrate highly efficient UV solar blind detectors, chemical sensors and recently material implication logic, physically unclonable functions using ZnO based memristors. In this talk, we will present a comparison of the different growth techniques for the growth of Zn1-xMgxO nanorods and nanowires. Sonochemical growth that provides a low temperature technique for enhanced Mg incorporation will be discussed. Structural and optical properties of the grown vertically aligned ZnO NW arrays characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and photoluminescence (PL) will be presented and discussed. Moreover, growth and characterization of Zn1-xMgxO/ZnO core shell nanowires will be addressed. The talk will conclude by highlighting some electronic/photonic device/system demonstration.

Keynote Forum

Claudio Nicolini
Nanoworld Institute Fondazione ELBA Nicolini, Italy
keynote: FUTURE OF NANOTECHNOLOGY
Biography:
Prof. Claudio Nicolini.after serving as Adjunct Professor at the University of Bari, he moved for 17 years to the United States , of which he became citizen since 1974, and was at Brown University, MIT,BNL and Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, where he became Associate Professor of Pathology and then Professor and Chairman of the Biophysics in 1976. In 1985, he was called “Chiara Fama” Professor and Chair of Biophysics at the University of Genoa, in Italy until 2012 , where he was Director of the Biophysics Institute, the Department of Biophiscal M&O Sciences and Technologies and the Nanoworld Institute. From 1993 until now is Life President of the Fondazione ELBA Nicolini. He was Chief Editor of Cell Biophysics (USA) , Science and Technology Advisor to Italian Prime Minister Craxi, Member of the National Science and Technology Council upon Parliament election, Scientific Director Industrial Consortium CIREF, Founder and CTS President Technobiochip; President Polo National Bioelectronics , President Scientific Technological Park of Elba Island. On May 29 2008,was elected in Moscow as a Foreign Member of the Russian Academy of Sciences, and on 2010 Professors Honoris Causa of Biophysics and Nanobiotechnology at Moscow State University. From 1 November 2010 until October 31 2012 has been at Arizona State University (USA) and at Curie Paris University and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility.. Still now among the 100 Top Italian Scientists in all disciplines worldwide (H index >30). He received several awards and prizes and has authored more than 500 publications in international scientific journals (SCI), 38 patents (WPI) , 29 books and Series Editor in Bioelectronics (Plenum) and Nanobiotechnology (Pan Stanford). His main scientific activities concerned cancer research, biophysics and nanotechnology, pioneering world-wide chromatin structure-function, molecular bioelectronics and nanobiotechnology.

Abstract:
Present Challenges and Future Solutions via Nanobiotechnology and Nanobiosciences (1) exist for Health, Electronics, Environment and Energy. World-wide situation appears extremely difficult and only at the nanoscale we can hope to embark on such undertaking with some degree of success, while keeping the environment and the earth viable and growing in the process. Energy is strongly interlinked with power generation, automation and environment, while similarly is happening ( at the nanoscale) for really intelligent hardware, being strongly interlinked to communication, defence and environment. Indeed the risk of upcoming ecological disasters, including global warming, can be reduced or avoided with the development of new energy sources nanotechnology-based from sun, wind and hydrogen. The far reaching effects will be beneficial for the entire humanity and for the survival and growth of earth. It seems that when the peak of world oil production will be reached by 2030 there will be furthermore an irreversibly declining resource facing an increasing demand for energy which could not be met. Other routes must then identified for Energy, Electronics and Environment and new developments have gained interest by an industrial point of view (2, 3) and our applications to energy, environment and electronics are here exemplified . An major problem still escaping a solution to humans is cancer that is being studied with someresult at molecular scale as strongly interlinked to differentiation, ageing and proliferation, but also to ecology. Its solution requires more coordinated efforts worldwide at the basic level subtracting the lead to the corporations that have been so far quite ineffective in both side of the Ocean linked to hospital and healthrelated institutions and we will be able to solve it only approaching with quite more focus the molecular quantitative scale correlating for human race benefits all pending problems in medicine (ageing, differentiation, cancer metastasis) at the protein level. Few examples are presented for these efforts going from molecular dynamics simulations of M2 protein in potential drugs discovery to an application to influenza virus, and from NAPPA QCM_D Nanoconductometric Assay to drug-protein and protein-protein interactions for the Clinics.

Keynote Forum

Der-Jang Liaw
National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taiwan
keynote: New Polymeric Nanomaterials via Precision Polymerization: Synthesis, Optoelectronics and Photovoltaics Applications
Biography:
Dr. Der-Jang LIAW, Polymer Science Doctor of Osaka University (Japan) now he is a Chair Professor of Chemical Engineering, NTUST. He has published about 360 SCI papers (h-index = 40 from ISI Web of Knowledge) and 60 patents. In 2009, He was a recipient of the International Award from the Society of Polymer Science, Japan. In addition, He received not only Outstanding Polymer Academic Research Prize and but also Lifetime Achievement Prize from Polymer Society, Taipei (Taiwan). He has been Academician of the Russian Academy of Engineering since 2011. Prof. Liaw is advisory boards member of Polymer, Materials, Polymer Journal, Polymer International and High performance polymers.

Abstract:
Advanced nanomaterials such as polyimides (PIs), polyamides (PAs), conjugated polymers and polynorbornenes (PNBs) were successfully synthesized through various polymerization methods such as low temperature polycondensation, Suzuki coupling and ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP). PIs derived from different architecture designs revealed unique physical-mechanical, electrical and chemical properties. PAs with the pyridine moiety displayed good film forming abilities, flexibility, high thermal resistance and proton sensitivity. Conjugated polymers were applied for single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) wrapping to separate metallic and semiconducting nanotubes. Polytriarylamines- or poly(triarylamine-fluorene)-based conjugated polymers possessed water/alcohol solubility and high carrier mobility. Their HOMO levels were controlled between -4.9 to -5.2 eV to fabricate heterojunction thin film devices which play an important role in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) and organic photovoltaics (OPVs). When alcohol soluble polytriarylamine-based conjugated polymers was used in perovskite solar cells, the overall power conversion efficiency (PCE%) at 6.3% was higher than PSS:PEDOT -based solar cell with PCE at 3.9%. In addition, nanographene-containing conjugated polymer was prepared by Suzuki coupling and its dispersion solution was measured by photoluminescence-excitation (PLE) for graphene optical applications. PNBs synthesized via ROMP showed excellent transparency at about 90 % and high thermal stability (Tgs > 160 oC). Triarylamine-containing polymers cast on flexible graphene-coated PET had electrochromic properties and capacity for multiple colour change reversibilities. These polymeric materials had high organo-solubility in common solvents and as a result can be used to fabricate optoelectronic devices such as solar cells, organic field effect transistors, polymer memories, and smart windows through solution process.

Keynote Forum

Adnen Mlayah
Paul Sabatier University,France
keynote: Plasmonics driven Nanotechnology
Biography:
Prof. Adnen Mlayah is a Professor of Physics at Paul Sabatier University of Toulouse and a researcher at the Centre d'Elaboration de Matériaux et d'Etudes Structurales-CNRS, working in the field of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology. Main research interests are centred around the optical properties of nanomaterials and nanostructures. He authored 100 research papers reporting experimental and theoretical investigations of the light-matter interaction at the nanoscale.

Abstract:
Electron-electron interaction in metals, combined with dielectric surface discontinuity, are responsible for the appearance of strongly localized collective electronic excitations, the so-called surface plasmons. Surface plasmons have been predicted by Ritchie, in the theoretical framework of the hydrodynamical Bloch equations, and proven experimentally by Powell and Swan using electron energy loss spectroscopy. Since then, owing to the strong progress in top-down surface patterning techniques (focused ion beam milling, e-beam lithography) and chemistry-based bottom-up synthesis routes, there has been a rise of theoretical and experimental studies of the optical properties of metal nanoparticles. The interest lies in the fact that surface plasmons open a way to the engineering of the light confinement, guidance, absorption and scattering with an unprecedented degree of precision and integration. As a matter of fact, with the same metal, for instance gold, light absorption can be tuned from the green region of the visible spectrum to the far infrared simply by changing the size and/or the shape of the metal nanoparticle, as well as its environment. Moreover, because of the localized nature of the surface plasmons, light can be confined to a volume as small as a few nanometer cube, thus strongly enhancing the local electromagnetic field intensity. These basic idea have let to a new way of thinking optics. Plasmonics is a branch of nano-optics that focuses on the light-matter interaction in metal nanoparticles and nanostructures. In this talk, I will first introduce the fundamental aspects of plasmonics, and describe a variety of experimental techniques that allowed to gain a deep understanding of the physics of surface plasmons. Then, I will discuss how research in plasmonics could be translated into technological applications. Health-care and life-sciences are the main application sectors of nanotechnology which is incorporated into medical products and also into treatments of fatal diseases. In particular, metal nanoparticles can efficiently absorb and scatter light and are therefore excellent candidates for cell-imaging-based diagnosis and treatment using the photo-thermal conversion of electromagnetic energy into heat. A strategic sector, for the world-wide economies, is the production, the storage and the distribution of energy. In particular, the jump from the Carbon era to the Hydrogen era is a challenging task, currently addressed in several research labs. Hybrid metal/semiconductor nanoparticles may help to bridge the gap for the efficient and low-coast production of hydrogen. I will discuss, current research devoted to the synthesis of nanoparticles with high quantum efficiency and photocatalytic properties. I will finally give some concluding remarks.